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US Patent: 4,378X
Vapor Engine
Gas or vapour engine
Patentee:
Samuel Morey - Orford, NH,

USPTO Classifications:
1/1

Tool Categories:
propulsion and energy : internal combustion engines : gas and gasoline engines

Assignees:
None

Manufacturer:
Not known to have been produced

Witnesses:
Alex Patterson
William Thorton

Patent Dates:
Granted: Apr. 01, 1826

Patent Pictures:
This patent was signed by John Q. Adams, President of the United States in 1826.
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Samuel Morey
Jay Leno's Garage article on Samuel Morey
The patents of Samuel Morey
Description:
Most of the patents prior to 1836 were lost in the Dec. 1836 fire. Only about 2000 of the almost 10000 documents were recovered. This is one of the recovered patents.

This patent is for one of the first gas combustion engines ever invented.

The original patent was found in the Rauner Special Collections Library at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, NH. Please see links for more information.

MOREY'S NEW VAPOUR ENGINE.

"Samuel Morey, Esq. a gentleman whose name is familiar to those who have devoted their attention to mechanical science, has obtained a patent for a vapour engine, which, in the opinion of competent judges, promises to answer well, in practice. The vacuum in the cylinder, is produced, by firing an explosive mixture of atmospheric air, and vapour from common proof spirits, mixed with a small portion of spirits of turpentine. A working model has been set in motion, and kept at work, without elevating the temperature of the fluid, from which the vapour is produced, to a higher degree than that of blood heat. Should no unforeseen difficulties present themselves, in its operation on a large scale, it will be the greatest improvement which has been made for many years, particularly in its application to locomotive engines; as the weight of the materials required, to keep it in action for a considerable length of time, will be so small, as not to be worth mentioning.

A gentleman has gone to England, for the purpose of obtaining a patent in that country."

Journal of the Franklin Institute Vol 1 1826 pg 252

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