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US Patent: 673,160
Method of Igniting and Regulating Combustion for Internal Combustion Engines
Patentee:
Rudolf Diesel - Munich, Bavaria, German Empire

USPTO Classifications:
123/1R, 123/27GE, 123/27R, 123/65VB, 261/DIG.45

Tool Categories:
propulsion and energy : internal combustion engines : diesel engines

Assignees:
Diesel Motor Co. of America - New York, NY

Manufacturer:
Not known to have been produced

Witnesses:
Paul Flasche
Emil Wenzel
L. N. Legendre
G. W. Eisenbraun

Patent Dates:
Applied: Apr. 06, 1898
Granted: Apr. 30, 1901

Patent Pictures:
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"Vintage Machinery" entry for Diesel Motor Co. of America
Description:
Abstract:

All internal-combustion engines which compress a combustible mixture and ignite the same at or near the end of the compression in any manner whatsoever allow the combustion which results from the stroke of the piston in any such ignition to take its own course— i.e., they do not regulate or control the ensuing combustion by any action of the machine itself. This neglect leads to important difficulties and irregularities. The governing of such machines is difficult and unsatisfactory. When such governing is attempted by changing the composition or proportion of the mixture while retaining the same apparatus for Igniting, mixtures which contain much combustible matter, as required when Working at full load, often ignite too suddenly and violently, while, on the other hand, the action of mixtures for light loads containing less combustible matter is apt to slow and retarded ignition, because the velocity of propagation of such ignition varies with the proportion of the mixture in very wide limits. Every mixture therefore of a combustible with air or with oxygen follows its own course, different from that of other mixtures, as recorded by indicator-diagrams. The igniting point of a combustible is that temperature up to which the mixture under the given pressure must be heated before the igniting-point combustible will ignite. The igniting point of any given combustible for a given pressure and a given proportion of the mixture of such combustible with air has a constant value, depending on the physical properties of the combustible. On the other hand, different combustibles have different igniting-points under the same condition of mixture and pressure. This variation can be further increased by variation in the pressure or in the proportions of the mixture to which the various combustibles are subjected before or during ignition. If, therefore, in internal-combustion engines regulation or governing is attempted by changing the quantity of the working mixture while keeping its proportions practically constant, the velocity with which ignition is propagated through-the mixture will also vary, because the amount of compression and the resulting temperature must vary with this quantity. Therefore each change in the load will change the course of the combustion but the course of the combustion after ignition vitally influences of the whole process. When the most economical course of combustion has once been determined, it is of the greatest importance to retain such control of the combustion, as to make it follow such course.

It follows from the foregoing that if a given mixture is compressed to a degree below its higher than the igniting or auxiliary combustible, then injecting this latter into the first compressed mixture will induce immediate ignition of the secondary fuel and gradual combustion of the first mixture, the combustion after ignition depending on the igniting or secondary combustible.

Claims:

1. The method of regulating combustion in internal-combustion engines which consists in producing a mixture of air or oxygen and a combustible, compressing the mixture to a temperature lower than the igniting-point of the combustible, and introducing under excess of pressure into the mixture a secondary combustible, the igniting-point of which is equal to or below the temperature due to the compression, substantially as described.

2. The method of regulating combustion in internal-combustion engines, which consists lower than the igniting-point of the combustible, and introducing under excess of pressure into the mixture a secondary combustible, the igniting-point of which is equal to or below the temperature due to the compression, substantially as described.

3. The method of regulating combustion in internal-combustion engines, which consists in producing a mixture of air or oxygen and a combustible, compressed to a. temperature lower than the igniting-point of the combustible, introducing into the mixture a secondary combustible, the igniting-point of which is equal to or below the temperature due to the compression, and regulating the quantity and duration of admission of such secondary combustible while expanding against a resistance, substantially as described.

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